71 years ago: the 36d Fighter Group blunts the German attack on Bastogne

After a day off because of weather, each squadron in the 362nd Fighter Group flew four missions in support of III Corps on Dec. 29, 1944. After the 377th’s first mission of the day, Lt. William Davis spotted a large number of German armored vehicles. “When we went down lower for further identification, there were swarms of Tiger tanks and other vehicles,” recalled Maj. Loren Herway. “We called this into the controller, who was totally surprised and asked for a double verification. By the time we landed and taxied in, there was all kinds of buzzing activity in response to this sighting.” As a direct result, the 378th bombed a concentration of 35 to 40 vehicles hidden in the woods east of Hanaville, claiming seven tanks, six half tracks and three trucks destroyed, then strafed and knocked out 17 trucks near Wiltz. This was probably the 1st SS Panzer Division, which was moving into position to launch a final assault on Bastogne. Pilots reported the tanks were lined up two-abreast on the road, and that the crews were seen hurrying out of their vehicles before they could be destroyed by the P-47s. “It sticks in my memory that Willie’s eagle eye resulted in blunting the German surprise on Bastogne,” Herway said.

In its second mission of the day, the 378th bombed Chenogne and left it burning, then wiped out two gun positions. Its biggest haul came on the day’s third mission, when the squadron bombed tanks in the woods near Longvilly, destroying or damaging 25 along with six trucks, then returned to the area and strafed repeatedly,

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