70 years ago: 19 destroyed by the 357th Fighter Group

About 20 miles southwest of the target, Liepzig, Red Flight of the 364th Fighter Squadron, 357th Fighter Group engaged a batch of Bf 109s, with the lead element attacking the German fighters while the second element provided top cover against an ambush. The ambush came, and Capt. Rick Smith was shot down and killed in the ensuing dogfight.

“Bud” Anderson was leading the 363rd, riding herd on the second box of bombers between Brunswick and Magdeburg. After combat began ahead of the squadron, “we dropped our tanks and started forward when eight Fw 190s went under me,” said Anderson. “They crossed in front of the low squadron of bombers and turned left flying our formation, mocking escort. It looked like a trap as eight more came down and bounced our second section. They turned into them and seemed to be doing OK, so our section went down on the ones below. I picked the leader, gave him a short burst from about 350 yards dead astern, got quite a few hits. He did a roll to the right and straightened out, skidding violently. The canopy flew off and he snapped over on his back, bailing out.

“I then saw another one heading for the clouds. He ducked in, but it was thin and I could see him once in a while, so I followed. He came out in a clear spot and I attacked from the rear, closing to 150 yards and getting quite a few hits. The canopy flew off, the pilot started to climb out, but settled back into the cockpit. I flew alongside and saw fire break out in the cockpit. He slowly rolled over and went straight in from about 8000 feet, making a huge explosion.

“My wingman came alongside and we started to climb back when another Fw 190 came out of the thin overcast 90 degrees to our course and behind us and above. We circled around on his tail, climbing after him. I cut him off, closed in and started firing. I didn’t get hits at first, so I slid around dead astern and got a few good hits. He then took his first evasive action, pulling up through the clouds. I followed, firing. He went down through it again, I got some hits in the cockpit area. The Fw 190 then did a violent snap roll to the right followed by a tight spin. Streamers were coming off his wingtips and tail surfaces and he spun right in, exploding. No chute came out.”

Clarence "Bud" Anderson

Clarence “Bud” Anderson

Blue Flight, with Don Bochkay leading, was flying just above Green Flight, and just after the four Mustangs dropped their tanks and started to turn, Bochkay looked into the sun and spotted “four Fw 190s coming down on us followed by four Bf 109s,” he said. “They went past us and broke into Green Flight, dead astern.”

“They fired and passed over the top of my flight, making a turn to cut us off,” said Capt. Robert Foy, who was Green Leader. “I called for (Blue Flight) to break right and I put 20 degrees of flaps down and cut my throttle, maneuvering to the rear of the enemy aircraft. I pulled up on the tail of the rear Fw 190. I fired at him (and) observed strikes all over the fuselage and wing, at which time he straightened out and bailed out in level flight.”

At the same time, Bochkay lined up the lead Fw 190 and fired; the German pilot split-S’ed and fled. Foy saw a P-51 being chased by a Bf 109 “just off at about 3 o’clock to me and low,” he said. “I pulled up and dived, pulling up below his tail. I followed him for about 15 seconds in close trail with him. I pulled up and fired two short bursts, observing strikes on his right wing and beneath the fuselage. The Bf 109 immediately broke to the left, did one rather fast roll, and (the pilot) bailed out.”

L4 Bochkay_posed

Don Bochkay

Foy called to his wingman and received no answer, then radioed his element leader, who replied that he’d lost Foy when he went after the Bf 109. “I pulled into a sharp left turn and saw a ship on my tail. I pulled into a tighter turn and started to spin into the overcast, recovering after about two turns. I pulled my flaps down, cut my throttle and continued turning to the left. I had completed about three-fourths of a 360-degree turn when a Bf 109 cut across in front of me at a fast rate of speed. I gave it full throttle, pulling up on his tail. I fired one burst, observing strikes on the right wing. The enemy aircraft did a split-S and I followed him. He pulled out of range in a vertical dive; I glanced at my air speed, which indicated well over 550 mph. The Bf 109 was still pulling away from me. I pulled out at 3000 feet and the Bf 109 was still in a vertical (dive). I climbed up to 6000 feet and circled the immediate area. I did not see the enemy aircraft hit the ground, but there was a spot on the ground that looked as if either a bomb or an airplane had gone in.”

Foy_I

Robert Foy

Bochkay had spotted another Bf 109 trying to dive to safety, and this time he stuck to his quarry. When he fired, “(the Bf 109’s) ammunition started to explode, tearing bits and pieces from both wings. The pilot then bailed out doing close to 600 mph; he delayed his opening. At 4000 feet the ship caught fire and crashed.”

Lt. William Overstreet found himself behind an Fw 190 and opened fire; “when I started getting hits he flipped over and bailed out,” he later wrote.

In all, the group scored 19 victories. In addition to the kills by Anderson, Bochkay, Overstreet and Foy, additional single scores went to Capts. John Pugh, Fred Smith, John Howell, and Mark Stepleton and Lts. Raymond Staude, and Gerald Tyler. Lts. Merle Allen and William Fennell shared a kill, and Capts. James Browning and Charles Summer each scored two

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69 years ago: the Yoxford Boys down 19 near Magdeburg

About 20 miles southwest of the target, Liepzig, the 364th  Fighter Squadron’s Red Flight engaged a batch of Bf 109s, with the lead element attacking the German fighters while the second element provided top cover against an ambush. The ambush came, and Capt. Rick Smith was hot down and killed in the ensuing dogfight.

“Bud” Anderson was leading the 363rd, riding herd on the second box of bombers between Brunswick and Magdeburg. After combat began ahead of the squadron, “we dropped our tanks and started forward when eight Fw 190s went under me,” said Anderson. “They crossed in front of the low squadron of bombers and turned left flying our formation, mocking escort. It looked like a trap as eight more came down and bounced our second section. They turned into them and seemed to be doing OK, so our section went down on the ones below. I picked the leader, gave him a short burst from about 350 yards dead astern, got quite a few hits. He did a roll to the right and straightened out, skidding violently. The canopy flew off and he snapped over on his back, bailing out.

“I then saw another one heading for the clouds. He ducked in, but it was thin and I could see him once in a while, so I followed. He came out in a clear spot and I attacked from the rear, closing to 150 yards and getting quite a few hits. The canopy flew off, the pilot started to climb out, but settled back into the cockpit. I flew alongside and saw fire break out in the cockpit. He slowly rolled over and went straight in from about 8000 feet, making a huge explosion.

“My wingman came alongside and we started to climb back when another Fw 190 came out of the thin overcast 90 degrees to our course and behind us and above. We circled around on his tail, climbing after him. I cut him off, closed in and started firing. I didn’t get hits at first, so I slid around dead astern and got a few good hits. He then took his first evasive action, pulling up through the clouds. I followed, firing. He went down through it again, I got some hits in the cockpit area. The Fw 190 then did a violent snap roll to the right followed by a tight spin. Streamers were coming off his wingtips and tail surfaces and he spun right in, exploding. No chute came out.”

Blue Flight, with Don Bochkay leading, was flying just above Green Flight, and just after the four Mustangs dropped their tanks and started to turn, Bochkay looked into the sun and spotted “four Fw 190s coming down on us followed by four Bf 109s,” he said. “They went past us and broke into Green Flight, dead astern.”

“They fired and passed over the top of my flight, making a turn to cut us off,” said Capt. Robert Foy, who was Green Leader. “I called for (Blue Flight) to break right and I put 20 degrees of flaps down and cut my throttle, maneuvering to the rear of the enemy aircraft. I pulled up on the tail of the rear Fw 190. I fired at him (and) observed strikes all over the fuselage and wing, at which time he straightened out and bailed out in level flight.”

At the same time, Bochkay lined up the lead Fw 190 and fired; the German pilot split-S’ed and fled. Foy saw a P-51 being chased by a Bf 109 “just off at about 3 o’clock to me and low,” he said. “I pulled up and dived, pulling up below his tail. I followed him for about 15 seconds in close trail with him. I pulled up and fired two short bursts, observing strikes on his right wing and beneath the fuselage. The Bf 109 immediately broke to the left, did one rather fast roll, and (the pilot) bailed out.”

Foy called to his wingman and received no answer, then radioed his element leader, who replied that he’d lost Foy when he went after the Bf 109. “I pulled into a sharp left turn and saw a ship on my tail. I pulled into a tighter turn and started to spin into the overcast, recovering after about two turns. I pulled my flaps down, cut my throttle and continued turning to the left. I had completed about three-fourths of a 360-degree turn when a Bf 109 cut across in front of me at a fast rate of speed. I gave it full throttle, pulling up on his tail. I fired one burst, observing strikes on the right wing. The enemy aircraft did a split-S and I followed him. He pulled out of range in a vertical dive; I glanced at my air speed, which indicated well over 550 mph. The Bf 109 was still pulling away from me. I pulled out at 3000 feet and the Bf 109 was still in a vertical (dive). I climbed up to 6000 feet and circled the immediate area. I did not see the enemy aircraft hit the ground, but there was a spot on the ground that looked as if either a bomb or an airplane had gone in.”

Bochkay had spotted another Bf 109 trying to dive to safety, and this time he stuck to his quarry. When he fired, “(the Bf 109’s) ammunition started to explode, tearing bits and pieces from both wings. The pilot then bailed out doing close to 600 mph; he delayed his opening. At 4000 feet the ship caught fire and crashed.”

Lt. William Overstreet found himself behind an Fw 190 and opened fire; “when I started getting hits he flipped over and bailed out,” he later wrote.

In all, the group scored 19 victories. In addition to the kills by Anderson, Bochkay, Overstreet and Foy, additional single scores went to Capts. John Pugh, Fred Smith, John Howell, and Mark Stepleton and Lts. Raymond Staude, and Gerald Tyler. Lts. Merle Allen and William Fennell shared a kill, and Capts. James Browning and Charles Summer each scored two

69 years ago: 25 victories for the 357th Fighter Group

The Luftwaffe was back up to challenge the 357th Fighter Group on April 11. Just after rendezvousing with bombers headed for Sorau, the 364th Fighter Squadron’s Green Flight ran across a single Bf 109, which dove for cover “After approximately five minutes of chasing, firing numerous bursts and observing numerous strikes, I shot the engine out of the Bf 109,” said Lt. John Carder. “The enemy pilot tried to crash land at in excess of 200 mph. The enemy aircraft hit the ground, bounced over high wires and a road, and crashed into the ground and exploded.”

Lt. Fletcher Adams had been with the bombers for about 20 minutes when he spotted a trio of Bf 109s below him. His flight leader, Lt. John England, took the tail-end plane; Adams took the second one and both chased their quarry to the deck. “The enemy plane took evasive action, turning and skidding,” said Adams. “I fired several bursts when he was going in an out of the clouds. A light stream of black smoke came out of the plane and he went into a cloud. I went over the cloud and next saw the pilot in a parachute. I saw a plane behind me, which I assumed to be my wingman. When I turned, however, he began to shoot at me from about 500 yards. I went down in evasive action to about 20 feet and pulled up sharply to the right. The enemy plane tried to follow this maneuver. After I had nearly completed a 360-degree turn, I saw the enemy plane spin into the ground explode and burn. I saw no parachute this time.”

White Flight of the 363rd spotted an He 111 “sneaking along right on the ground,” said “Bud” Anderson. “The first pass wasn’t so good,” he said. “I pulled up and the rest of the flight came in.” After Lt. Henry Kayser put a burst into the cockpit and Lt. William Overstreet shot up the plane from dead astern, Anderson stitched the He 111 from tail to cockpit, then Lt. Edward Simpson came in and set the left engine ablaze. “He tried to crash land, and did,” said Simpson. “The ship burst into flames after hitting a pole and sliding along the ground. The crew jumped out.” Simpson, Kayser and Anderson each added individual victories during the mission

In all, the group destroyed 25 planes. The victors included Lts. Gilbert O’Brien, John Pugh, Arval Roberson, Charles Peters, Richard Peterson, William Reese, LeRoy Ruder, and Robert Shaw, who each downed one. Half-credits went to John England and Don Bochkay

69 years ago: The 357th Fighter Group cleans up over Berlin

The 357th Fighter Group again went to Berlin on 6 March. Among the 15 aborts was the new group commander, Lt. Col. Don Graham, placing Maj. Tommy Hayes, the CO of the 364th Fighter Squadron, in charge. The continent was completely socked in by cloud, hampering navigation. At the designated time for rendezvous with the bombers, Hayes broke radio silence, asking Capt. William O’Brien, “Where’s Berlin, Obee?”

“I think Berlin is behind us,” O’Brien radioed back. The group executed a 180-degree turn within an opening in the clouds, and just as it completed the turn the bombers broke out of the clouds seven miles away and just off to the left. Before anyone could exult in the near-perfect rendezvous, another voice broke in – “Bogies, two and three o’clock level!” More than 100 German aircraft headed for the bombers, led by seven Bf 110s of III/NJG.5 commanded by Maj. Hans Kogler. Behind Kogler’s nightfighters were 41 Me 410s and 72 Bf 109s.

“The Bf 110 that I latched on to was easy pickings, which was O.K. with me,” said O’Brien. “I got him burning in his left engine area, and we were in a very steep diving right turn, when my machine guns started jamming.” As O’Brien tried to clear his guns, the Bf 110 dived vertically, smashing into what O’Brien described as a building resembling a factory. “You never saw such a fine explosion!”

William O'Brien

William O’Brien

Capt. Leroy Ruder was flying Lt. John Carder’s wing, and he also attacked a 110. “Carder overshot and I fired a burst from close range that blew the canopy to pieces and must have killed the pilot,” Ruder wrote in his diary. “The plane went into a steep dive from 20,000 feet and we followed it down to 5,000 feet where Capt. O’Brien fired at it until it burst into flames.”

Meanwhile, the 362nd Fighter Squadron’s Capt. Davis Perron and wingman Lt. Rod Starkey spotted a damaged B-17 under attack by two Fw 190s. The Germans turned and ran, but Perron caught one and opened fire. “His wing tank blew up and he caught fire and went into an inverted spin.” Perron broke off and the second Fw 190 inexplicably flew in front of him, only to meet a similar fate. Returning to the bombers, Perron spotted a twin-engined fighter he identified as a Me 210 and shot it down as well. Starkey added a Bf 109 of his own.

William O’Brien, his Mustang’s guns jammed, formed up with Leroy Ruder for the flight home. A few minutes later, Ruder called a bogey at two o’clock, another Bf 110, armed with rockets and still looking to get a shot at the bombers. “I attacked from dead astern at about 200 to 150 yards and hit the left engine,” said Ruder. “I next fired at the fuselage and right engine striking both of them. I had only one gun firing at the time but it did the job. Oil from the enemy aircraft covered my canopy and he started into a spin with both engines smoking badly.” The Bf 110, from III/NJG.5, managed to crashland and its pilot, Leutnant G. Wolf, survived the encounter.

As Hayes’ flight headed home, he spotted a single Bf 109 flying the opposite direction and a few miles to his right. Hayes reversed his course and held his fire until he had closed to 200 yards before opening fire. Strikes sparkled around the cockpit area and the Bf 109 lurched into a dive, exploding against the German soil. Uffz. K. Pelz of JG.302 was killed in the crash.

Shortly, another member of Hayes’ flight, Lt. John Howell, spotted a Bf 109, this one flown by Oberleutnant Gerhard Loos, a 92-kill ace and Staffelkapitan with JG.54. Howell opened fire and overshot Loos, but Carder closed in to finish the German ace’s plane off. Loos may have bailed out before this attack, but he fell out of his parachute and plunged to his death.

After each of them had downed a Bf 110, Capt. Glendon Davis and wingman Lt. Tom Harris were headed home when they spotted a B-17 straggler with an Fw 190 on its tail. “We dove down on the enemy aircraft but couldn’t close on him as the tail gunner of the bomber was firing at him,” said Davis. “We broke to the side of the enemy aircraft and at that time he saw us and broke into us. We turned into him and he started for the deck in a tight spiral. We followed him down, indicating from 450 to 500 mph. At 10,000 feet he dropped his belly tank. At 5000 feet his airplane appeared to be stalling as he tried to pull out. His canopy flew off but the plane went right into the ground without the pilot getting out.”

In all, the group scored 20 kills – including victories for Don Bochkay, Joe Broadhead and Morris Stanley and a half-kill for Arval Roberson – without a single loss, its first of what would be many big days.

68 years ago: the 357th FG downs 22 over Berlin

On 5 December 1944, during the 357th Fighter Group’s mission to Berlin, “Bud” Anderson’s flight flew ahead to break up any attacks forming there. “We intercepted about 20 Fw 190s,” he reported. “They broke around and I picked one out, firing a burst and getting good hits all over. He rolled over and I did not follow as there were too many enemy aircraft around.” Anderson’s wingman, Lt. James Sloan said, “I do not believe the enemy aircraft ever recovered from this spin as the pilot was either killed or the controls shot away.”

Clarence "Bud" Anderson recounts a mission to his crewmen.

Clarence “Bud” Anderson recounts a mission to his crewmen.

The other element, made up of Lt. James Crump and Lt. George Rice, broke after an Fw 190. “I saw another Fw 190 following us,” said Rice. “Lt. Crump’s Jerry appeared to be pretty well clobbered. He rolled over and started for the deck, apparently out of control, just as I called for Lt. Crump to break. I turned into the Fw 190 following us and came around behind him; he started making tight diving and climbing turns as I closed the distance. I pulled up to about 1000 yards but was pulling so many G’s I couldn’t see the sight. I fired a short burst anyhow and broke out of the turn a bit, then got on him again. I closed to about 50 yards and fired a good burst and saw many strikes in the fuselage and cockpit area. As I pulled up beside him he jettisoned the canopy and bailed out.”

Soon, Anderson spotted four more Fw 190s darting in and out of some haze. “I fired and they all broke left and I latched on to the No. 4 man, firing a long burst at close range. The canopy blew off and fire belched from the cockpit as it spun straight down into a broken overcast. I then closed on the No. 3 man, fired at good range and more good hits occurred in the cockpit region. This ship spun down, smoking, out of control.”

Lt. James Browning spotted two Bf 109s ahead of him; “I was coming practically head-on when they saw me and dropped their belly tanks,” Browning said. “I made a turn to the left to get on their tails and they broke into us. I took the second and with the K-14 made quite a deflection shot. I observed hits on the engine and cockpit. He went into a spin and the pilot bailed out.”

Jim Browning

Jim Browning

As the bombers reached the target, a new gaggle of fighters rose to challenge them. The 362nd was in position to intercept. “Two ships at the very front of their formation were the first to break,” said Capt. “Kit” Carson. “I broke with them and fired on the leader, getting several strikes on his fuselage. He made a dive for the clouds; I chased him but inside of the clouds I couldn’t see him. I broke out into the open and a few seconds later tracers were breaking around my ship. I broke to the right as hard as I could. The Jerry was right behind me, but quite a distance back. I managed to get into a scissoring turn, making several head-on passes. He finally reversed his turn and I tagged onto him, firing another burst at about 200 yards, closing fast and getting strikes on the fuselage. Then in a tight spiral, the Bf 109 went down through the overcast. I went beneath the overcast and saw the burning wreckage.”

Major Joseph Broadhead was leading the group this day; he spotted 10 to 15 enemy planes below a thin layer of cirrus and led the jump, hitting an Fw 190 from very close range. Broadhead lost sight of his victim, but his wingman, Lt. Myron Becraft, saw the Fw 190 go straight into the ground and explode.

K4 Broadhead_takeoff

Joe Broadhead (at right) takes off to start a mission in 1944.

Lt. John Kirla picked out one enemy craft, opening fire at about 700 yards, “getting strikes at his wing roots and on his fuselage,” Kirla said. “The plane began streaming smoke and pieces flew off as I closed to 50 yards, getting more strikes. I believe the pilot was killed, for the Bf 109 went straight down in a dive at terrific speed and hit the ground and exploded.

“After I had destroyed the Bf 109, Lt. (John) Sublett and I stooged around the deck, looking for more enemy planes. We spotted a lone Fw 190 on the deck and gave chase, catching him in two or three minutes. I got on his tail and fired a long burst from 700 yards, getting strikes on the fuselage and tail. Suddenly, the pilot rolled his ship over and bailed out.” Lt. Matthew Martin spotted fluids coming from Kirla’s Mustang. He moved over to inspect the problem and was sprayed by fuel – Kirla had a leaking tank. As he radioed Kirla to switch tanks, Martin’s plane caught fire; he dove to try to extinguish the blaze, to no avail, then climbed to bail out altitude. When he tried to escape the cockpit, the plane snap-rolled and trapped him half-in, half-out of the canopy. Pushing with both hands, Martin propelled himself away from the cockpit but hit the horizontal stabilizer with his thigh; he chute opened and he tried to evade, but in his hobbled condition he was easily captured by the Germans. Kirla’s plane kept flying, and he made it back to celebrate a 22-victory mission.

In addition to the victories by Anderson, Rice, Browning, Carson, Broadhead and Kirla, Capt. Don Bochkay and Lts. Dale Karger and Frederick C. McCall downed two and Lts. Thomas Adams, Morris Gallant, Paul Hatala, Edmund Juszczyk, Robert Schimanski, John Stern, Johnnie Carter and Capt. Herman Zetterquist each downed one. Zetterquist failed to return home and became a POW.

68 years ago: the 357th FG downs 19 on a mission to Liepzig

The 357th Fighter Group had gone through a long dry spell before a mission to Liepzig on 29 June 1944, but they would make up for lost time this day. About 20 miles southwest of the target, the 364th’s Red Flight engaged a batch of Bf 109s, with the lead element attacking the German fighters while the second element provided top cover against an ambush. The ambush came, and Capt. Rick Smith was shot down and killed in the ensuing dogfight.

“Bud” Anderson was leading the 363rd, riding herd on the second box of bombers between Brunswick and Magdeburg. After combat began ahead of the squadron, “we dropped our tanks and started forward when eight Fw 190s went under me,” said Anderson. “They crossed in front of the low squadron of bombers and turned left flying our formation, mocking escort. It looked like a trap as eight more came down and bounced our second section. They turned into them and seemed to be doing OK, so our section went down on the ones below. I picked the leader, gave him a short burst from about 350 yards dead astern, got quite a few hits. He did a roll to the right and straightened out, skidding violently. The canopy flew off and he snapped over on his back, bailing out.

“I then saw another one heading for the clouds. He ducked in, but it was thin and I could see him once in a while, so I followed. He came out in a clear spot and I attacked from the rear, closing to 150 yards and getting quite a few hits. The canopy flew off, the pilot started to climb out, but settled back into the cockpit. I flew alongside and saw fire break out in the cockpit. He slowly rolled over and went straight in from about 8000 feet, making a huge explosion.

“My wingman came alongside and we started to climb back when another Fw 190 came out of the thin overcast 90 degrees to our course and behind us and above. We circled around on his tail, climbing after him. I cut him off, closed in and started firing. I didn’t get hits at first, so I slid around dead astern and got a few good hits. He then took his first evasive action, pulling up through the clouds. I followed, firing. He went down through it again, I got some hits in the cockpit area. The Fw 190 then did a violent snap roll to the right followed by a tight spin. Streamers were coming off his wingtips and tail surfaces and he spun right in, exploding. No chute came out.”

Blue Flight, with Don Bochkay leading, was flying just above Green Flight, and just after the four Mustangs dropped their tanks and started to turn, Bochkay looked into the sun and spotted “four Fw 190s coming down on us followed by four Bf 109s,” he said. “They went past us and broke into Green Flight, dead astern.”

“They fired and passed over the top of my flight, making a turn to cut us off,” said Capt. Robert Foy, who was Green Leader. “I called for (Blue Flight) to break right and I put 20 degrees of flaps down and cut my throttle, maneuvering to the rear of the enemy aircraft. I pulled up on the tail of the rear Fw 190. I fired at him (and) observed strikes all over the fuselage and wing, at which time he straightened out and bailed out in level flight.”

At the same time, Bochkay lined up the lead Fw 190 and fired; the German pilot split-S’ed and fled. Foy saw a P-51 being chased by a Bf 109 “just off at about 3 o’clock to me and low,” he said. “I pulled up and dived, pulling up below his tail. I followed him for about 15 seconds in close trail with him. I pulled up and fired two short bursts, observing strikes on his right wing and beneath the fuselage. The Bf 109 immediately broke to the left, did one rather fast roll, and (the pilot) bailed out.”

Foy called to his wingman and received no answer, then radioed his element leader, who replied that he’d lost Foy when he went after the Bf 109. “I pulled into a sharp left turn and saw a ship on my tail. I pulled into a tighter turn and started to spin into the overcast, recovering after about two turns. I pulled my flaps down, cut my throttle and continued turning to the left. I had completed about three-fourths of a 360-degree turn when a Bf 109 cut across in front of me at a fast rate of speed. I gave it full throttle, pulling up on his tail. I fired one burst, observing strikes on the right wing. The enemy aircraft did a split-S and I followed him. He pulled out of range in a vertical dive; I glanced at my air speed, which indicated well over 550 mph. The Bf 109 was still pulling away from me. I pulled out at 3000 feet and the Bf 109 was still in a vertical (dive). I climbed up to 6000 feet and circled the immediate area. I did not see the enemy aircraft hit the ground, but there was a spot on the ground that looked as if either a bomb or an airplane had gone in.”

Bochkay had spotted another Bf 109 trying to dive to safety, and this time he stuck to his quarry. When he fired, “(the Bf 109’s) ammunition started to explode, tearing bits and pieces from both wings. The pilot then bailed out doing close to 600 mph; he delayed his opening. At 4000 feet the ship caught fire and crashed.”

Lt. William Overstreet found himself behind an Fw 190 and opened fire; “when I started getting hits he flipped over and bailed out,” he later wrote.

In all, the group scored 19 victories. In addition to the kills by Anderson, Bochkay, Overstreet and Foy, additional single scores went to Capts. John Pugh, Fred Smith, John Howell, and Mark Stepleton and Lts. Raymond Staude, and Gerald Tyler. Lts. Merle Allen and William Fennell shared a kill, and Capts. James Browning and Charles Summer each scored two

68 years ago: The 357th Fighter Group knocks down 25

The Luftwaffe was back up to challenge the 357th Fighter Group on April 11, 1944. Just after rendezvousing with bombers headed for Sorau, the 364th Fighter Squadron’s Green Flight ran across a single Bf 109, which dove for cover “After approximately five minutes of chasing, firing numerous bursts and observing numerous strikes, I shot the engine out of the Bf 109,” said Lt. John Carder.  “The enemy pilot tried to crash land at in excess of 200 mph. The enemy aircraft hit the ground, bounced over high wires and a road, and crashed into the ground and exploded.”

While the flight was reforming, they spotted two Fw 190s ahead of them. Lt. Mark Stepleton entered into a turning fight with one of them, making six turns and firing bursts the entire time, “observing hits on the engine, cockpit and wings,” he said. “My guns jammed after every burst but due to an experimental hydraulic gun charger, I was able to clear the jam and fire again. I overran the enemy aircraft, at which time Lt. Charles Sumner closed and observed hits on the enemy aircraft, which crashed and exploded.”

Lt. Robert C. Smith was flying wing to Capt. G.D. Currie in when they too spotted two Bf 109s and dived on them. The chased continued from 23,000 to 4,000 feet, when Smith was forced to break into an approaching Bf 109. About 10 minutes later, Lt. Robert Shaw, also in this flight, heard Currie call for his flight to reform, but Currie himself failed to return to base. He was downed by flak and became a POW.

Lt. Fletcher E. Adams had been with the bombers for about 20 minutes when he spotted a trio of Bf 109s below him. His flight leader, Lt. John England, took the tail-end plane; Adams took the second one and both chased their quarry to the deck. “The enemy plane took evasive action, turning and skidding,” said Adams. “I fired several bursts when he was going in an out of the clouds. A light stream of black smoke came out of the plane and he went into a cloud. I went over the cloud and next saw the pilot in a parachute. I saw a plane behind me, which I assumed to be my wingman. When I turned, however, he began to shoot at me from about 500 yards. I went down in evasive action to about 20 feet and pulled up sharply to the right. The enemy plane tried to follow this maneuver. After I had nearly completed a 360-degree turn, I saw the enemy plane spin into the ground explode and burn. I saw no parachute this time.”

White Flight of the 363rd Fighter Squadron spotted an He 111 “sneaking along right on the ground,” said “Bud” Anderson. “The first pass wasn’t so good,” he said. “I pulled up and the rest of the flight came in.” After Lt. Henry Kayser put a burst into the cockpit and Lt. William Overstreet shot up the plane from dead astern, Anderson stitched the He 111 from tail to cockpit, then Lt. Edward Simpson came in and set the left engine ablaze. “He tried to crash land, and did,” said Simpson. “The ship burst into flames after hitting a pole and sliding along the ground. The crew jumped out.” Simpson, Kayser and Anderson each added individual victories during the mission

Also failing to return from the mission was Lt. William Gray, who became a POW after his engine failed, and Capt. Arthur Lingo, who was probably shot down by fighters and killed. But, in all, the group destroyed 25 planes. Capt. Paul DeVries and Montgomery Throop, Lts. Gilbert O’Brien, John Pugh, Arval Roberson, Harold Kenney, Charles Peters, Hollis Nowlin, Richard Peterson, William Reese, LeRoy Ruder, Robert Shaw and Robert Smith each downed one, Harry Ankeny and John England shared one, and half-credits went to Don Bochkay and Maurice Postle.